Purposeful thoughts

The future is already here — it’s just not very evenly distributed.

—William Gibson, I know he’s not an Afrofuturist per se   but its a good quote related to issues of representation, inequality, and the future. 

So why try to predict the future at all if it’s so difficult, so nearly impossible? Because making predictions is one way to give warning when we see ourselves drifting in dangerous directions. Because prediction is a useful way of pointing out safer, wiser courses. Because, most of all, our tomorrow is the child of our today. Through thought and deed, we exert a great deal of influence over this child, even though we can’t control it absolutely. Best to think about it, though. Best to try to shape it into something good.

—Octavia Butler, “A Few Rules for Predicting the Future,” Essence 2000. pg 264.

afutureancient:

The repost of my “The Mask As Technology” and an #interview I did with Rasheedah Phillips of @afrofuturistaffair is on Atlanta BlackStar’s #blerds series! #atlantablackstar #technology #themask #masks #afrofuturism



"How do we shape minds to think outside of the boxes of the oppressive cultures in which we live and develop responsible technologies? How do we cultivate cultures and critical thinking that will foster new technologies? How do we make available access to information, spaces and tools that will help people to create new technologies?"

afutureancient:

The repost of my “The Mask As Technology” and an #interview I did with Rasheedah Phillips of @afrofuturistaffair is on Atlanta BlackStar’s #blerds series! #atlantablackstar #technology #themask #masks #afrofuturism

"How do we shape minds to think outside of the boxes of the oppressive cultures in which we live and develop responsible technologies? How do we cultivate cultures and critical thinking that will foster new technologies? How do we make available access to information, spaces and tools that will help people to create new technologies?"

…Afrofuturism is a lens that renders reality via a pan-technological perspective. It views everything as a type of technology. Afrofuturism embraces the artifice and fully exploits the fact that all things that we think define us are merely constructions that function as prosthetics that produce various effects relating to their users’ needs. Throughout history, Black people, particularly oppressed Black people, have instantly noticed the affordances of various types of technology while under various forms of control. The most important affordances of these liberation technologies have always been freedom, equity, and agency.

Afrofuturism is not only a subgenre of science fiction. Instead, it is a larger aesthetic mode that encompasses a diverse range of artists working in different genres and media who are united by their shared interest in projecting black futures derived from Afrodiasporic experiences.

Lisa Yaszek (2006) Afrofuturism, science fiction, and the history of the future, Socialism and Democracy, 20:3,pg 42.   

Black Panther Newspaper. Jan 1969. 

Black Panther Newspaper. Jan 1969. 

Part of the story of black music has been this - that losing everything except basic dignity and decency is a potentially survivable disaster. The other part is that staying true to the best in yourself may mean talking in dark, crazed, visionary tongues for a season.

—Mark Sinker, “Loving the Alien: Black Science Fiction” The Wire, 1992.

from Toward Culturally Responsive Computing Education by Ron Eglash, Juan E. Gilbert, and Ellen Foster from Communications of the ACM, July 2013.

from Toward Culturally Responsive Computing Education by Ron Eglash, Juan E. Gilbert, and Ellen Foster from Communications of the ACM, July 2013.

The actual beginnings of our expression are post Western (just as they certainly are pre-western). It is only necessary that we arm ourselves with complete self knowledge the whole technology (which is after all just expression of who ever) will change to reflect the essence of a freed people. Freed of an oppressor, but also as Touré has reminded we must be “free from the oppressor’s spirit,” as well. It is this spirit as emotional construct that can manifest as expression as art or technology or any form.

Technology & Ethos 1970 by Imamu Amiri Baraka (LeRoi Jones) from Raise Rage Rays Raze: Essays Since 1965